Economics Textbooks and Books For the Layman
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You’re only here for a short visit.  Don’t hurry.  Don’t worry.  And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.”—Walter C. Hagen

 

Our journey through life is short and uncertain.  We know not how far we will travel, nor the route we will take.  We can determine the normal life expectancy for an average person in our situation, but that doesn’t te

ll us much about our individual life expectancies.  We can plan to travel a certain pathway, but life has a way of forcing unexpected detours.  The only thing we can be absolutely certain of is that our visit on earth will be a relatively short one in terms of the history of the world.

           

We have a lot more control over the quality of our life than the quantity, and quality is what really counts.  Some people, who die at age 50, have had far more productive and satisfying lives than certain other people who live to be 100.   So the most important actions we can take with regard to our lives is to make sure that we make the most of our years no matter how many we may ultimately have. 

           

We should avoid rushing through life, we should do everything within our power to minimize worry, and we should take the time to smell the flowers along life’s journey.   Some might argue that, since life is short, we should hurry through it in order to experience as much as possible in our allotted time.   But, except in the case of emergencies, hurrying rarely improves the quality of anyone’s life.    

           

Most worry is a waste of time and needlessly inflicts pain on those who succumb to it.  There are exceptions in that some worry is productive.  If we worry about maintaining good health habits and getting our taxes paid on time, that worry will, hopefully, motivate us to take positive actions that will benefit us.  But worrying about things over which we have no control just doesn’t make good sense.  If we worry about becoming sick at a time when we are in good health, the worry alone may contribute to illness.   If we worry about losing our job too much, our worry may distract us from doing the best job we can, and it could possibly lead to the loss of the job.

           

We should do everything in our power to exercise caution and to plan for the future in an effort to minimize problems.  But, if we are doing that, it is counterproductive to worry about things that are totally beyond our control.  And, of course, we should try to enjoy every day of life that God gives us, because the present is the most precious time we have. Actually, the present is the only time we have for certain.  The past has already been spent, and the future is only something that we hope for    

                                                                        Copyright 2014 Allen W. Smith

You’re only here for a short visit.  Don’t hurry.  Don’t worry.  And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.”—Walter C. Hagen

 

Our journey through life is short and uncertain.  We know not how far we will travel, nor the route we will take.  We can determine the normal life expectancy for an average person in our situation, but that doesn’t te

ll us much about our individual life expectancies.  We can plan to travel a certain pathway, but life has a way of forcing unexpected detours.  The only thing we can be absolutely certain of is that our visit on earth will be a relatively short one in terms of the history of the world.

           

We have a lot more control over the quality of our life than the quantity, and quality is what really counts.  Some people, who die at age 50, have had far more productive and satisfying lives than certain other people who live to be 100.   So the most important actions we can take with regard to our lives is to make sure that we make the most of our years no matter how many we may ultimately have. 

           

We should avoid rushing through life, we should do everything within our power to minimize worry, and we should take the time to smell the flowers along life’s journey.   Some might argue that, since life is short, we should hurry through it in order to experience as much as possible in our allotted time.   But, except in the case of emergencies, hurrying rarely improves the quality of anyone’s life.    

           

Most worry is a waste of time and needlessly inflicts pain on those who succumb to it.  There are exceptions in that some worry is productive.  If we worry about maintaining good health habits and getting our taxes paid on time, that worry will, hopefully, motivate us to take positive actions that will benefit us.  But worrying about things over which we have no control just doesn’t make good sense.  If we worry about becoming sick at a time when we are in good health, the worry alone may contribute to illness.   If we worry about losing our job too much, our worry may distract us from doing the best job we can, and it could possibly lead to the loss of the job.

           

We should do everything in our power to exercise caution and to plan for the future in an effort to minimize problems.  But, if we are doing that, it is counterproductive to worry about things that are totally beyond our control.  And, of course, we should try to enjoy every day of life that God gives us, because the present is the most precious time we have. Actually, the present is the only time we have for certain.  The past has already been spent, and the future is only something that we hope for    

                                                                        Copyright 2014 Allen W. Smith

You’re only here for a short visit.  Don’t hurry.  Don’t worry.  And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.”—Walter C. Hagen

 

Our journey through life is short and uncertain.  We know not how far we will travel, nor the route we will take.  We can determine the normal life expectancy for an average person in our situation, but that doesn’t te

ll us much about our individual life expectancies.  We can plan to travel a certain pathway, but life has a way of forcing unexpected detours.  The only thing we can be absolutely certain of is that our visit on earth will be a relatively short one in terms of the history of the world.

           

We have a lot more control over the quality of our life than the quantity, and quality is what really counts.  Some people, who die at age 50, have had far more productive and satisfying lives than certain other people who live to be 100.   So the most important actions we can take with regard to our lives is to make sure that we make the most of our years no matter how many we may ultimately have. 

           

We should avoid rushing through life, we should do everything within our power to minimize worry, and we should take the time to smell the flowers along life’s journey.   Some might argue that, since life is short, we should hurry through it in order to experience as much as possible in our allotted time.   But, except in the case of emergencies, hurrying rarely improves the quality of anyone’s life.    

           

Most worry is a waste of time and needlessly inflicts pain on those who succumb to it.  There are exceptions in that some worry is productive.  If we worry about maintaining good health habits and getting our taxes paid on time, that worry will, hopefully, motivate us to take positive actions that will benefit us.  But worrying about things over which we have no control just doesn’t make good sense.  If we worry about becoming sick at a time when we are in good health, the worry alone may contribute to illness.   If we worry about losing our job too much, our worry may distract us from doing the best job we can, and it could possibly lead to the loss of the job.

           

We should do everything in our power to exercise caution and to plan for the future in an effort to minimize problems.  But, if we are doing that, it is counterproductive to worry about things that are totally beyond our control.  And, of course, we should try to enjoy every day of life that God gives us, because the present is the most precious time we have. Actually, the present is the only time we have for certain.  The past has already been spent, and the future is only something that we hope for    

                                                                        Copyright 2014 Allen W. Smith

You’re only here for a short visit.  Don’t hurry.  Don’t worry.  And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.”—Walter C. Hagen

 

Our journey through life is short and uncertain.  We know not how far we will travel, nor the route we will take.  We can determine the normal life expectancy for an average person in our situation, but that doesn’t te

ll us much about our individual life expectancies.  We can plan to travel a certain pathway, but life has a way of forcing unexpected detours.  The only thing we can be absolutely certain of is that our visit on earth will be a relatively short one in terms of the history of the world.

           

We have a lot more control over the quality of our life than the quantity, and quality is what really counts.  Some people, who die at age 50, have had far more productive and satisfying lives than certain other people who live to be 100.   So the most important actions we can take with regard to our lives is to make sure that we make the most of our years no matter how many we may ultimately have. 

           

We should avoid rushing through life, we should do everything within our power to minimize worry, and we should take the time to smell the flowers along life’s journey.   Some might argue that, since life is short, we should hurry through it in order to experience as much as possible in our allotted time.   But, except in the case of emergencies, hurrying rarely improves the quality of anyone’s life.    

           

Most worry is a waste of time and needlessly inflicts pain on those who succumb to it.  There are exceptions in that some worry is productive.  If we worry about maintaining good health habits and getting our taxes paid on time, that worry will, hopefully, motivate us to take positive actions that will benefit us.  But worrying about things over which we have no control just doesn’t make good sense.  If we worry about becoming sick at a time when we are in good health, the worry alone may contribute to illness.   If we worry about losing our job too much, our worry may distract us from doing the best job we can, and it could possibly lead to the loss of the job.

           

We should do everything in our power to exercise caution and to plan for the future in an effort to minimize problems.  But, if we are doing that, it is counterproductive to worry about things that are totally beyond our control.  And, of course, we should try to enjoy every day of life that God gives us, because the present is the most precious time we have. Actually, the present is the only time we have for certain.  The past has already been spent, and the future is only something that we hope for    

                                                                        Copyright 2014 Allen W. Smith

You’re only here for a short visit.  Don’t hurry.  Don’t worry.  And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.”—Walter C. Hagen

 

Our journey through life is short and uncertain.  We know not how far we will travel, nor the route we will take.  We can determine the normal life expectancy for an average person in our situation, but that doesn’t te

ll us much about our individual life expectancies.  We can plan to travel a certain pathway, but life has a way of forcing unexpected detours.  The only thing we can be absolutely certain of is that our visit on earth will be a relatively short one in terms of the history of the world.

           

We have a lot more control over the quality of our life than the quantity, and quality is what really counts.  Some people, who die at age 50, have had far more productive and satisfying lives than certain other people who live to be 100.   So the most important actions we can take with regard to our lives is to make sure that we make the most of our years no matter how many we may ultimately have. 

           

We should avoid rushing through life, we should do everything within our power to minimize worry, and we should take the time to smell the flowers along life’s journey.   Some might argue that, since life is short, we should hurry through it in order to experience as much as possible in our allotted time.   But, except in the case of emergencies, hurrying rarely improves the quality of anyone’s life.    

           

Most worry is a waste of time and needlessly inflicts pain on those who succumb to it.  There are exceptions in that some worry is productive.  If we worry about maintaining good health habits and getting our taxes paid on time, that worry will, hopefully, motivate us to take positive actions that will benefit us.  But worrying about things over which we have no control just doesn’t make good sense.  If we worry about becoming sick at a time when we are in good health, the worry alone may contribute to illness.   If we worry about losing our job too much, our worry may distract us from doing the best job we can, and it could possibly lead to the loss of the job.

           

We should do everything in our power to exercise caution and to plan for the future in an effort to minimize problems.  But, if we are doing that, it is counterproductive to worry about things that are totally beyond our control.  And, of course, we should try to enjoy every day of life that God gives us, because the present is the most precious time we have. Actually, the present is the only time we have for certain.  The past has already been spent, and the future is only something that we hope for    

                                                                        Copyright 2014 Allen W. Smith

You’re only here for a short visit.  Don’t hurry.  Don’t worry.  And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.”—Walter C. Hagen

 

Our journey through life is short and uncertain.  We know not how far we will travel, nor the route we will take.  We can determine the normal life expectancy for an average person in our situation, but that doesn’t te

ll us much about our individual life expectancies.  We can plan to travel a certain pathway, but life has a way of forcing unexpected detours.  The only thing we can be absolutely certain of is that our visit on earth will be a relatively short one in terms of the history of the world.

           

We have a lot more control over the quality of our life than the quantity, and quality is what really counts.  Some people, who die at age 50, have had far more productive and satisfying lives than certain other people who live to be 100.   So the most important actions we can take with regard to our lives is to make sure that we make the most of our years no matter how many we may ultimately have. 

           

We should avoid rushing through life, we should do everything within our power to minimize worry, and we should take the time to smell the flowers along life’s journey.   Some might argue that, since life is short, we should hurry through it in order to experience as much as possible in our allotted time.   But, except in the case of emergencies, hurrying rarely improves the quality of anyone’s life.    

           

Most worry is a waste of time and needlessly inflicts pain on those who succumb to it.  There are exceptions in that some worry is productive.  If we worry about maintaining good health habits and getting our taxes paid on time, that worry will, hopefully, motivate us to take positive actions that will benefit us.  But worrying about things over which we have no control just doesn’t make good sense.  If we worry about becoming sick at a time when we are in good health, the worry alone may contribute to illness.   If we worry about losing our job too much, our worry may distract us from doing the best job we can, and it could possibly lead to the loss of the job.

           

We should do everything in our power to exercise caution and to plan for the future in an effort to minimize problems.  But, if we are doing that, it is counterproductive to worry about things that are totally beyond our control.  And, of course, we should try to enjoy every day of life that God gives us, because the present is the most precious time we have. Actually, the present is the only time we have for certain.  The past has already been spent, and the future is only something that we hope for    

                                                                        Copyright 2014 Allen W. Smith

You’re only here for a short visit.  Don’t hurry.  Don’t worry.  And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.”—Walter C. Hagen

 

Our journey through life is short and uncertain.  We know not how far we will travel, nor the route we will take.  We can determine the normal life expectancy for an average person in our situation, but that doesn’t te

ll us much about our individual life expectancies.  We can plan to travel a certain pathway, but life has a way of forcing unexpected detours.  The only thing we can be absolutely certain of is that our visit on earth will be a relatively short one in terms of the history of the world.

           

We have a lot more control over the quality of our life than the quantity, and quality is what really counts.  Some people, who die at age 50, have had far more productive and satisfying lives than certain other people who live to be 100.   So the most important actions we can take with regard to our lives is to make sure that we make the most of our years no matter how many we may ultimately have. 

           

We should avoid rushing through life, we should do everything within our power to minimize worry, and we should take the time to smell the flowers along life’s journey.   Some might argue that, since life is short, we should hurry through it in order to experience as much as possible in our allotted time.   But, except in the case of emergencies, hurrying rarely improves the quality of anyone’s life.    

           

Most worry is a waste of time and needlessly inflicts pain on those who succumb to it.  There are exceptions in that some worry is productive.  If we worry about maintaining good health habits and getting our taxes paid on time, that worry will, hopefully, motivate us to take positive actions that will benefit us.  But worrying about things over which we have no control just doesn’t make good sense.  If we worry about becoming sick at a time when we are in good health, the worry alone may contribute to illness.   If we worry about losing our job too much, our worry may distract us from doing the best job we can, and it could possibly lead to the loss of the job.

           

We should do everything in our power to exercise caution and to plan for the future in an effort to minimize problems.  But, if we are doing that, it is counterproductive to worry about things that are totally beyond our control.  And, of course, we should try to enjoy every day of life that God gives us, because the present is the most precious time we have. Actually, the present is the only time we have for certain.  The past has already been spent, and the future is only something that we hope for    

                                                                        Copyright 2014 Allen W. Smith

You’re only here for a short visit.  Don’t hurry.  Don’t worry.  And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.”—Walter C. Hagen

 

Our journey through life is short and uncertain.  We know not how far we will travel, nor the route we will take.  We can determine the normal life expectancy for an average person in our situation, but that doesn’t te

ll us much about our individual life expectancies.  We can plan to travel a certain pathway, but life has a way of forcing unexpected detours.  The only thing we can be absolutely certain of is that our visit on earth will be a relatively short one in terms of the history of the world.

           

We have a lot more control over the quality of our life than the quantity, and quality is what really counts.  Some people, who die at age 50, have had far more productive and satisfying lives than certain other people who live to be 100.   So the most important actions we can take with regard to our lives is to make sure that we make the most of our years no matter how many we may ultimately have. 

           

We should avoid rushing through life, we should do everything within our power to minimize worry, and we should take the time to smell the flowers along life’s journey.   Some might argue that, since life is short, we should hurry through it in order to experience as much as possible in our allotted time.   But, except in the case of emergencies, hurrying rarely improves the quality of anyone’s life.    

           

Most worry is a waste of time and needlessly inflicts pain on those who succumb to it.  There are exceptions in that some worry is productive.  If we worry about maintaining good health habits and getting our taxes paid on time, that worry will, hopefully, motivate us to take positive actions that will benefit us.  But worrying about things over which we have no control just doesn’t make good sense.  If we worry about becoming sick at a time when we are in good health, the worry alone may contribute to illness.   If we worry about losing our job too much, our worry may distract us from doing the best job we can, and it could possibly lead to the loss of the job.

           

We should do everything in our power to exercise caution and to plan for the future in an effort to minimize problems.  But, if we are doing that, it is counterproductive to worry about things that are totally beyond our control.  And, of course, we should try to enjoy every day of life that God gives us, because the present is the most precious time we have. Actually, the present is the only time we have for certain.  The past has already been spent, and the future is only something that we hope for    

                                                                        Copyright 2014 Allen W. Smith

You’re only here for a short visit.  Don’t hurry.  Don’t worry.  And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.”—Walter C. Hagen

 

Our journey through life is short and uncertain.  We know not how far we will travel, nor the route we will take.  We can determine the normal life expectancy for an average person in our situation, but that doesn’t te

ll us much about our individual life expectancies.  We can plan to travel a certain pathway, but life has a way of forcing unexpected detours.  The only thing we can be absolutely certain of is that our visit on earth will be a relatively short one in terms of the history of the world.

           

We have a lot more control over the quality of our life than the quantity, and quality is what really counts.  Some people, who die at age 50, have had far more productive and satisfying lives than certain other people who live to be 100.   So the most important actions we can take with regard to our lives is to make sure that we make the most of our years no matter how many we may ultimately have. 

           

We should avoid rushing through life, we should do everything within our power to minimize worry, and we should take the time to smell the flowers along life’s journey.   Some might argue that, since life is short, we should hurry through it in order to experience as much as possible in our allotted time.   But, except in the case of emergencies, hurrying rarely improves the quality of anyone’s life.    

           

Most worry is a waste of time and needlessly inflicts pain on those who succumb to it.  There are exceptions in that some worry is productive.  If we worry about maintaining good health habits and getting our taxes paid on time, that worry will, hopefully, motivate us to take positive actions that will benefit us.  But worrying about things over which we have no control just doesn’t make good sense.  If we worry about becoming sick at a time when we are in good health, the worry alone may contribute to illness.   If we worry about losing our job too much, our worry may distract us from doing the best job we can, and it could possibly lead to the loss of the job.

           

We should do everything in our power to exercise caution and to plan for the future in an effort to minimize problems.  But, if we are doing that, it is counterproductive to worry about things that are totally beyond our control.  And, of course, we should try to enjoy every day of life that God gives us, because the present is the most precious time we have. Actually, the present is the only time we have for certain.  The past has already been spent, and the future is only something that we hope for    

                                                                        Copyright 2014 Allen W. Smith

You’re only here for a short visit.  Don’t hurry.  Don’t worry.  And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.”—Walter C. Hagen

 

Our journey through life is short and uncertain.  We know not how far we will travel, nor the route we will take.  We can determine the normal life expectancy for an average person in our situation, but that doesn’t te

ll us much about our individual life expectancies.  We can plan to travel a certain pathway, but life has a way of forcing unexpected detours.  The only thing we can be absolutely certain of is that our visit on earth will be a relatively short one in terms of the history of the world.

           

We have a lot more control over the quality of our life than the quantity, and quality is what really counts.  Some people, who die at age 50, have had far more productive and satisfying lives than certain other people who live to be 100.   So the most important actions we can take with regard to our lives is to make sure that we make the most of our years no matter how many we may ultimately have. 

           

We should avoid rushing through life, we should do everything within our power to minimize worry, and we should take the time to smell the flowers along life’s journey.   Some might argue that, since life is short, we should hurry through it in order to experience as much as possible in our allotted time.   But, except in the case of emergencies, hurrying rarely improves the quality of anyone’s life.    

           

Most worry is a waste of time and needlessly inflicts pain on those who succumb to it.  There are exceptions in that some worry is productive.  If we worry about maintaining good health habits and getting our taxes paid on time, that worry will, hopefully, motivate us to take positive actions that will benefit us.  But worrying about things over which we have no control just doesn’t make good sense.  If we worry about becoming sick at a time when we are in good health, the worry alone may contribute to illness.   If we worry about losing our job too much, our worry may distract us from doing the best job we can, and it could possibly lead to the loss of the job.

           

We should do everything in our power to exercise caution and to plan for the future in an effort to minimize problems.  But, if we are doing that, it is counterproductive to worry about things that are totally beyond our control.  And, of course, we should try to enjoy every day of life that God gives us, because the present is the most precious time we have. Actually, the present is the only time we have for certain.  The past has already been spent, and the future is only something that we hope for    

                                                                        Copyright 2014 Allen W. Smith

You’re only here for a short visit.  Don’t hurry.  Don’t worry.  And be sure to smell the flowers along the way.”—Walter C. Hagen

 

Our journey through life is short and uncertain.  We know not how far we will travel, nor the route we will take.  We can determine the normal life expectancy for an average person in our situation, but that doesn’t te

ll us much about our individual life expectancies.  We can plan to travel a certain pathway, but life has a way of forcing unexpected detours.  The only thing we can be absolutely certain of is that our visit on earth will be a relatively short one in terms of the history of the world.

           

We have a lot more control over the quality of our life than the quantity, and quality is what really counts.  Some people, who die at age 50, have had far more productive and satisfying lives than certain other people who live to be 100.   So the most important actions we can take with regard to our lives is to make sure that we make the most of our years no matter how many we may ultimately have. 

           

We should avoid rushing through life, we should do everything within our power to minimize worry, and we should take the time to smell the flowers along life’s journey.   Some might argue that, since life is short, we should hurry through it in order to experience as much as possible in our allotted time.   But, except in the case of emergencies, hurrying rarely improves the quality of anyone’s life.    

           

Most worry is a waste of time and needlessly inflicts pain on those who succumb to it.  There are exceptions in that some worry is productive.  If we worry about maintaining good health habits and getting our taxes paid on time, that worry will, hopefully, motivate us to take positive actions that will benefit us.  But worrying about things over which we have no control just doesn’t make good sense.  If we worry about becoming sick at a time when we are in good health, the worry alone may contribute to illness.   If we worry about losing our job too much, our worry may distract us from doing the best job we can, and it could possibly lead to the loss of the job.

           

We should do everything in our power to exercise caution and to plan for the future in an effort to minimize problems.  But, if we are doing that, it is counterproductive to worry about things that are totally beyond our control.  And, of course, we should try to enjoy every day of life that God gives us, because the present is the most precious time we have. Actually, the present is the only time we have for certain.  The past has already been spent, and the future is only something that we hope for    

                                                                        Copyright 2014 Allen W. Smith

Inspirational Books & Essays

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Thinking Your Way To A Better Life

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